Michael Musto in Oldster Magazine

Michael Musto at 66, photographed by Andrew Werner.

Michael Musto is a longtime entertainment and nightlife writer for the Village Voice. Musto has written four books, appeared on countless TV channels and streaming services, and has been named one of the Out 100 of the most influential LGBTQs in the country.

“… while you have all this wisdom about how to behave, those situations tend to not happen again, so the wisdom is useless. You can try passing it on to someone younger, but they don’t want to hear it any more than I craved advice from my grandparents.”

Oldster Magazine

Throwing away what I write.

I’m writing first thing every morning. I throw it all away within the week.

Here’s what I figure;

  • I lived it.
  • I wrote about it.
  • I filed away the highlighted bits I want to remember.
  • I read it to my therapist.

That’s enough, don’t you think? I’m happy to say “see you later” to all of that.

In some domains, people describe this as “workshopping.” It’s a tryout. Some of it will be rolled into yet another edit. And each edit gets more to the point.

A couple of years ago I threw away all of my journals and it felt good to have all of that living out of the way.

I’m mentoring Steve and he needs to write

Through a mentoring program with the nonprofit StartOut, I’m working with a firecracker named Steve.

StartOut is the national nonprofit that creates great leaders by empowering LGBTQ entrepreneurs.

I’m telling you this cat Steve is on fire. He’s pulling together the biggest deals for a big San Francisco tech company. We meet by phone every two weeks and have never met in person. He’s all business and I appreciate that in the exchange. But he is intense.

He’s also full of young me-ness, so I know where he’s coming from. Having been a young star myself, the world doesn’t always welcome you and your big sense of self.

So it was no surprise that he has a nemesis. This asshole takes credit for his work, tries to undermine him and makes it generally unpleasant to work there. Those kind of downer people can really take the wind out of your sails. And you can’t always turn those situations around. If you can, your heart may be out of it by then. So, we’re agreed that he’s moving on.

He’s interviewing at all the usual mega-unicorns and they quickly see a talent they could use. He’s got this covered. Steve is confident, has the numbers to prove his value and I imagine presents well. You should see his polished LinkedIn profile picture.

And still a Google search on him shows little about his expertise. What will his next advocate find out about him beyond a good interview? Why is he exceptional? He has to change that by writing about what he does.

He’s working on a case study on his big win at the company. My challenge for him was to write another story anonymized with more about the process. Why are you the best at this? Break it out into … more