Me in Yahoo Money

I got a nice mention and quote in this piece America’s workplace has changed in 5 key ways because of COVID-19. The latest from my friend Kerry Hannon.

“The pandemic has accelerated a movement to think of work and life in a more open-minded way,” Jeff Tidwell, CEO and cofounder of Next for Me, told me. “No matter the age, over the past year we rethought what work-life balance could be, including the time we spend with our families and communities, and even where we live.”

Hawaii 2000-2004

Kauai

In 1999 we had a windfall (for us at least) from my stock options at E*TRADE. At the same time, I was offered a job in New York with Oncology.com, a new company supporting cancer patients. That was too good to turn down.

There were only a couple of big considerations. 1. We’d just purchased a home on the beach on Kauai 2. We had recently gone through cartwheels to buy our first house in Boulder Creek, California. So I had a job and apartment in New York, a house we rented out in California, and the new property on Kauai we needed to prep to rent out until we could be there.

I agreed to take the Oncology.com job for one year, and after six months I would be on Kauai for 2 weeks every other month. 6 months in is also when Lucky headed to Kauai driving our pickup across the country, shipping everything across the pacific. He also sent our beloved dog Rex in the cargo hold of his flight. Poor Rex would be quarantined on Oahu for 6 weeks.

Aloha Dude Vacation Rentals

We would call it Aloha Dude Vacation Rentals.

The Compound
Aloha Dude House
Surf Dude Apartment

Aloha Dude Internet Hut

Around July of 2001 we got the big idea to open an internet hut – a hangout spot for visitors looking to log in while on vacation (this was pre-iPhone). It was also a stop on a cruise through the small town of Kapa’a. There was a hostel around the corner, restaurants, and other shops along the single road around the island.

We would suspend the *iconic 4′ wide disco ball on a pulley apparatus each morning. The team would spend the first hour dusting all of the hip … more

UVA 1980

In late 1979 I was a Production Manager for the “alternative” newspaper New Times Weekly in Phoenix. I’d just done a stint at the Santa Barbara News and Review as a production artist, so this was a step up for me plus my gang was running wild in Phoenix and I didn’t want to miss out on that.

Chic Me.

While the Art Director took a vacation I got to step into the role for a special issue on Disco. I remember that it was a real big deal for me at 22. While putting the editorial together, I worked with a creative gang of freelance photographers, stylists, models, and other creative types. They were a few years older than me and took me under their wings.

There was symbiosis from the start.

The most gregarious was Jimi, a photographer that was making a name for himself in the dusty old cow town. He persisted and ended up in New York managing photo studios and expanding his portfolio.

Carole!

There was Carole who traveled the world modeling and joining in the theatrical antics of “art band” The Tubes. Her brother was the synthesizer player and did some very cool airbrushed pieces for the performances.

Ed!

Then there was Ed who I knew informally from his vintage shop “Sunset Boulevard.” He had a keen eye as an art director and stylist. He also dressed me since I was mostly wearing wrinkled army fatigues in those days. I was nearly stripped of my gay badge, but Ed quickly remedied that.

Ed’s business partner was Lee who had east coast sensibilities and also weighed in on my disheveled look. To this day he’s one of the smoothest dressers I’ve ever met.

For a minute I am reminded that I have known these … more

I Have A Series On Forbes

I’m writing a series of articles on Forbes about the creation of my company Next For Me.

 

 

 

My New Company: Next For Me

I started a new company this fall. It’s called Next For Me. We publish a weekly newsletter that’s a resource to post-50 life for new worka new purpose, or a new social contributionYou can subscribe right here.

It began to add up for me. There are 76 million baby boomers in total. The number of Americans ages 65 and older is projected to more than double from 46 million today to over 98 million by 2060.

Over 40% aren’t financially prepared for a life without traditional income past 65. People are living significantly longer than when big programs like Social Security were put in place. Pensions have been cut from most careers outside of government. The Government Accountability Office said in an October report, “If no action is taken, a retirement crisis could be looming.”

The companies of today are not prepared to welcome and employ older employees with meaningful work. Hiring and support for the unique needs of the audience is lacking. Most HR departments are just beginning to acknowledge the need to address these workers in new ways. In fact, ageism is as prevalent as ever in the workplace.

And still, 60% say the most important thing they look for in a job is meaningful work.

Many are looking at next careers or how to evolve in their existing industries in ways that will account for the wisdom and experience they bring to their work. In some forward-thinking organizations mentoring programs have emerged. The roles can be exchangeable too. A unique perspective from a younger worker might keep the older worker up to date on industry trends. In return, the more senior worker can provide advice on decision making or some “been there, done that” common sense.

The staggering numbers and the volume … more

The Modern Elder Academy

I attended a two week beta program at The Modern Elder Academy.

The program was presented in three pieces:

  1. A look at what made you who you became and are now.
  2. A, no kidding, nine hour ‘vision quest’ alone in a teepee in the desert – which I saw as a reset.
  3. How you’d like to construct what’s next for you.

It didn’t hurt that it was on a beautiful beach on the western Baja coast in a spectacularly appointed compound.

I wrote about the experience in my Forbes series.

 

60 and Gay in Tech

Below is the video and text of a presentation I gave at Tech Inclusion in San Francisco on October 19, 2017

Today is my epic story and some techniques for surviving as a graying, gay person in tech.

I’ve worked in tech for close to 35 years and alternative newspapers before that. 

I was always interested in changing the status quo through media and associated myself with organizations that I thought at least accepted who I was.

When there was discrimination it was often subtle, but thanks to some early activism I was always reactive first.

Sorry mean people.


I survived with a technique I’ve come to call

“The Humanist + Activist Approach”

Here’s how it works and why it’s more important than ever today.

  1. If you haven’t noticed… blatant harrassment and discrimination is filling the news cycles.
    1. We’re in a dangerous political environment.  Those in power today are turning back the clock on many gains in civil rights. Just yesterday our vile, so called president was joking about lynching gays. Seriously
    2. This thinking is becoming normalized and will bleed into the workplace and discrimination will become even more OK.
  2. This may be hard, but before you react, take time to understand the experiences and point of view of the people you interact with. That’s the Humanist part.
  3. You DO have a right to be at the table without discrimination though. so, Don’t ever back down.- That’s the Activist part.

Humanist Stance

  1. Some Signs
    1. Subtle uneasiness. Always can tell that something is off that you can’t put your finger on it. This is when understanding that person matters.
    2. Still, a lot goes unstated. You can almost hear it “He’s old and doesn’t get it” “Gay people are different” “I’d rather not know about that thing I don’t understand” “we don’t
more

KKCR Radio Shows

 

In 2000-2004 we lived on the beach on the island of Kauai. We operated The Aloha Dude Vacation Rentals and had a retail spot called The Aloha Dude Internet Hut.

During that time the kind folks at KKCR Radio gave me the dream of a lifetime, a radio show all my own. My first foray was a very early morning show I called “Sleep Walking”, then my pal Michele Rundgren offered me a chance to fill in for her Friday drive-time show “Chick Rock.” As I had taken the DJ name DJ DICK. it made sense that I would rename the show to “Dick Rock” for those shows.

I have an appreciation for obscure audio bits and this was in the era of Napster, so I found a ton of interesting clips to mix in with the shows.

Someday (or not) I’ll convert the many live recordings which are on VHS tapes and CDs.

Here are a few of the shows:

DJ Dick – April 27, 2002

DJ Dick – February 2, 2002

DJ Dick – January 19, 2002

DJ Dick – September 30, 2005 : 1-3

DJ Dick September 30, 2005 – 2

DJ Dick – September 30, 2005 – 3

                

Here’s a set from August 1, 2003 Part 1:

and Part 2: